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Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

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Y Ena
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Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

#1

Post by Y Ena »

If you want to take photos of your diorama like a real scene, try these steps.

<Things to prepare>
1. The camera which has a mode of manual-focus.
2. Image processing software that has “Focus Stacking” tool.
ex; Photoshop , Helicon Focus,  → see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Focus_stacking

Image

<Processes>
1.Choose suitable picture as background which you like, landscape or sky, etc.
2.Print out the picture to A4 paper. (photo-grade paper is not good because it reflects light)
3.Place your model, base and background together to make a scene from a viewpoint where you like.
4.Place your camera to tripod not to move.
5.Switch the mode to manual-focus, take multiple photos by varying focus area, from most frontal area to background picture.
6.Transfer the images to your PC, then start the image processing tool.
7.Try processing until you get desired result. (Actual process varies by software you choose)

Probably background can be real scape or sky, worth to be challenged.

I use Helicon Focus. Bit expensive but functions well.
http://www.heliconsoft.com/heliconfocus.html
My camera is Ricoh GX-100

I hope you get nice pics ;)

↓The last F-104's background is digital data. Aircraft is taken by focus stacking.

Image

Image

Image

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moresby
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Re: Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

#2

Post by moresby »

Hmm...

I'm a sort of old-fashioned photographer and tend to concentrate more on the taking of the picture than on 'post-production' but this looks interesting: even using all tricks I know to enhance depth of field sometimes my photos show some area unfocused.

I've to check if my version of Photoshop features this Focus-Stacking and try it.

I believe this post should be moved in the '1/144 Model and Collecting FAQs' section, 'Methods of small scale model photography' thread.

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moresby
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Re: Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

#3

Post by moresby »

By the way, I've recently 'discovered' the virtual ISO sensitivity setting in my Nikon (duh!): I usually chose the '200 ASA' equivalent just because I was used to take pictures using film featuring this sensitivity.

Surely, choosing higher sensitivity may result in poorer image quality, yet it works as a powerful virtual light enhancer for your camera: I've been able to select very narrow F-stops coupled with aceptable exposure times (F 32+1/125!) enjoying great depth of field.
Last edited by moresby on Wed Sep 05, 2012 5:50, edited 1 time in total.

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Y Ena
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Re: Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

#4

Post by Y Ena »

Hi moresby.
I recognized the FAQ thread you suggested.
I agree to move this topic to there.
Depth of field is curious topic, I would like to hear your information further :D

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Re: Taking Photos using Focus-Stacking

#5

Post by moresby »

The basic trick is using a diaphragm opening selection as narrow as possible: the smallest the 'hole' the light passes through, the widest (in depth) the area in focus in the picture.

Not all cameras allow the photographer such a choice: many are all-automatic or just offer a selection between automatic programs: if you can choose your objective diaphragm opening, these are usually marked as F-stops numbers. Don't ask me why, but small numbers (1,8 2,8, 4 ...) give wide diaphragm opening (imagine a cat's eye in the dark), and high numbers (11, 22, 32) narrow ones (that's what we want!).

See also the other thread in this section (methods of small scale model photography)

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