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Techniques for assembling Resin models

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Russ

Techniques for assembling Resin models

#1

Post by Russ »

Area for techniques on assembling 1/144 cast resin models.

Articles needed.

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pbhawkin
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Re: Techniques for assembling Resin models

#2

Post by pbhawkin »

Resin is NOT as scary to work with as a lot of people seem to think!

Sure you can't use regular plastic glue (It's not plastic!!). CA (Superglue) is the glue of choice even for someone like me who has an allegy to it!! A little goes a long way and the use of a toothpick dipped in a small 'pool' of CA on a palette and then placed on the joint of two parts will wick it's way in and secure them well. You can always add more if needed. I find I don't need to use an accelerator at all. Epoxy also works but has a relatively long drying time.

Parts can be brittle, especially smaller bits, and resin doesn't have a great strength for supporting loads (IE landing gear legs on larger planes can buckle).

Resin can warp, especially in direct hot sunlight, BUT any warped part can be fixed with the pouring of boiling water over it and gentle bending between your fingers to the right shape. It will stay in that shape unless reheated again.

It can be filled with regular puttys. This is perhaps one of the biggest issues with resin is that depending on how well it was cast there can be numerous 'pinholes' in/on the surface and even small missing areas especially in corners and thin narrow parts. A fine putty is often needed on large areaas of resin kits to fill any 'pinholes'.

Resin also needs to be WELL washed with water and detergent to remove ALL traces of silicon and whatever else was used to help the resin casting out of the mold at time of manufacture. Rubbing alcohol or Iso or IPA will also work fine. If this step is not done then YOU run the risk of paint not adhering to the resin!

It can be sanded and shaped with hobby knives and sandpaper.

Any paint can adhere to it (see above about cleaning first).
Regards
Peter

Russ

Re: Techniques for assembling Resin models

#3

Post by Russ »

I'm going to post some videos here. Look up in google - videos section and type building resin models and you should get some good ones like this-- it starts slow though. subject is a sailplane.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2J_taKfNl0

This is about building a spacecraft kit. If you do a search on resin kit build, you will find 95 percent of the work being done and videotaped is of sci-fi craft and Anime items like gundam.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtQKAfrn ... re=related

Here is another aircraft build, in 1/72, but its a small kit and should translate well to 144 size craft. Saab Drakken prototype

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJbf1OltEog

Here is a video of a plastic kit build just for comparisons. Revell F104 in Spanish AF markings.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yXp_iljck8

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smeg1959
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Re: Techniques for assembling Resin models

#4

Post by smeg1959 »

Some resin kits are cast with a hollowed out area to represent the cockpit (e.g. Kami de Koro Koro's latter efforts, Anigrand, Peters Planes' Gold range), and may include a vacformed canopy. However, a large percentage of resin kits - particularly in smaller scales like 1/144 - mould the canopy as an integral part of the fuselage, the idea being that the modeller paints the area in an appropriate colour (more often than not, black) to simulate the canopy.

Some resin kit manufacturers like Alex Trant (Airalex) include an optional canopy section cast in clear resin. The idea is that the modeller cuts away the appropriate part of the fuselage casting and replaces it with the clear alternative. The downside to this is that clear resin is notorious for highlighting air bubbles within.

The other option is to cut away the canopy area, open out the cockpit using a Dremel tool or similar and detail to whatever level you see fit, then make and fit a hollow clear canopy. The two options for the last step are to vacform your own canopies - great if you have vacforming equipment or the time to build your own unit (e.g. http://www.instructables.com/id/Make-a- ... stic-vacu/) - or, if the shape isn't too complex, use the "heat-n-smash" method.

The latter involves making a solid former – often referred to as the “smash mould” - then taking a sheet of clear acetate and heating it gently over, say, a candle until it softens sufficiently for you to “smash” it down over the former and create the clear part required. The most obvious source of the smash mould is the solid resin part cut away from the fuselage. Don’t forget to sand it down uniformly to compensate for the thickness of the canopy you are forming. There is a well-illustrated tutorial viewable at http://www.cebudanderson.com/mirror.htm.

The following photos show the above process on an Airalex DH Hornet/Sea Hornet. The first shows the fuselage with the solid cockpit cut away and opened out. Note the rods inserted through the fuselage to aid in the fitting and alignment of the wings.
DH103 Sea Hornet 1.gif
DH103 Sea Hornet 1.gif (205.71 KiB) Viewed 5275 times
The second photo (below) shows the heat-n-smash canopy trial-fitted on the partially complete Hornet. The grey primer is Mr Surfacer 1000. As the canopy is sitting higher than I would like it and is not quite long enough, I will be reshaping the smash mould and having another "go" at the process. The model also needs a fair bit of sanding, scribing and resurfacing ... early days.

Stay tuned ...
DH103 Sea Hornet 5.gif
DH103 Sea Hornet 5.gif (162.12 KiB) Viewed 5275 times
OTB ...
GB13 - Late 298 (Aeronavale), Bf109E-3a Strela (Bulgarian AF), ČKD LT vz.38 Praga (Slovakian Army)

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smeg1959
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Re: Techniques for assembling Resin models

#5

Post by smeg1959 »

Just an observation on liquid CA glue.

It would appear that, once opened and exposed to the air, the CA deteriorates in terms of its bonding ability. I compared a 5-mL bottle I have been using since the start of the year with one I just bought today and the latter clearly dries both faster and stronger. An undercarriage leg secured with the older adhesive yesterday fell off today whilst touching up with a fine paintbrush. Using the new glue, the leg not only adhered much better initially than the day before, needing support for mere seconds versus minutes whilst positioning, it also dried considerably stronger.

I am now keeping the older glue more as a filler than as an adhesive. It still dries hard enough, but not too hard to be sanded after a couple of hours.
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GB13 - Late 298 (Aeronavale), Bf109E-3a Strela (Bulgarian AF), ČKD LT vz.38 Praga (Slovakian Army)

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Re: Techniques for assembling Resin models

#6

Post by mike_m »

For painting resin I would highly recommend a primer, I build a lot of resin ship models and it is essential if using acrylics. I live in teh UK and use spray can primer from Halfords. Don't spray the model directly as it will be flooded with paint, but use quick passes with the edge of the spray and it will work fine

Mike

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